POSTPONED UNTIL FALL--TALKING LEAVES CELEBRATES SUFFRAGE WITH HISTORIAN ELLEN CAROL DUBOIS AT HALLWALLS

ELLEN CAROL DUBOIS WAS SCHEDULED ON A NATIONAL TOUR TO PROMOTE HER NEW BOOK SUFFRAGE, AND CONCERNS ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS HAVE LED TO THE CANCELLATION OF THE TOUR.  ELLEN STILL INTENDS TO COME TO BUFFALO TO DISCUSS THE BOOK FOR US AT HALLWALLS, BUT WILL NOT BE ABLE TO DO SO UNTIL SOMETIME IN THE FALL, ON A DATE TO BE DETERMINED. TALKING LEAVES WILL STILL HAVE COPIES OF THE BOOK AVAILABLE IN THE STORE, AND FROM THIS WEBSITE, SHOULD YOU WISH TO PICK IT UP NOW.  WE ARE SORRY FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.  THE HEALTH AND SAFETY OF OUR CUSTOMERS, PRESENTERS, AND STAFF IS ALWAYS A PARAMOUNT CONCERN.

Talking Leaves…Book and Hallwalls Contemporary Art Center are pleased to welcome former UB Professor Ellen Carol Dubois to celebrate publication of her authoritative new book, Suffrage: Women’s Long Battle for the Vote (Simon and Schuster). Honoring the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the Constitution, this exciting history explores the full scope of the movement to win the vote for women through portraits of its bold leaders and devoted activists. Ellen Carol Dubois will be on hand in the Cinema at Hallwalls, 341 Delaware Avenue, on Wednesday, April 1, at 7 pm to talk about her book and sign copies. The event is free and open to the public. Attendees are encouraged to purchase a copy of the book as an act of support and respect for the author and the hosts of the local launch of this important work.

Distinguished historian Ellen Carol DuBois begins in the pre-Civil War years with foremothers Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Sojourner Truth as she explores the links of the woman suffrage movement to the abolition of slavery. After the Civil War, Congress granted freed African American men the right to vote but not white and African American women, a crushing disappointment. DuBois shows how suffrage leaders persevered through the Jim Crow years into the reform era of Progressivism. She introduces new champions Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Paul, who brought the fight into the 20th century, and she shows how African American women, led by Ida B. Wells-Barnett, demanded voting rights even as white suffragists ignored them.

DuBois explains how suffragists built a determined coalition of moderate lobbyists and radical demonstrators in forging a strategy of winning voting rights in crucial states to set the stage for securing suffrage for all American women in the Constitution. In vivid prose DuBois describes suffragists’ final victories in Congress and state legislatures, culminating in the last, most difficult ratification, in Tennessee. She follows women’s efforts to use their voting rights to win political office, increase their voting strength, and pass laws banning child labor, ensuring maternal health, and securing greater equality for women.

Suffrage: Women’s Long Battle for the Vote is sure to become the authoritative account of one of the great episodes in the history of American democracy; it certainly impressed these advance readers:

“This book is a treasure! A wealth of material is gathered here on behalf of the stirring, seventy-year struggle for the political enfranchisement of American women. Others have written about it before, but none as thrillingly, as freshly, and as comprehensively as does Ellen DuBois in this book. Suffrage deserves a permanent place on the ever-growing shelf of distinguished feminist history."—Vivian Gornick

Suffrage reads like an exciting novel. Ellen DuBois presents her well-researched history of women’s long battle for the vote through superb story-telling, in which the major personalities in the struggle to enfranchise women come alive in all their complexity. Though we know the story will end in the victory of the 19th Amendment, Suffrage is a page-turner.” —Lillian Faderman, author of Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers and The Gay Revolution

“This is a great American story, beautifully told.  Ellen DuBois enables us to appreciate the drama of the long battle for women's suffrage and the heroism of many of its advocates, as well as the movement's imperfections.   At a time when many of our constitutional rights are under assault, this is an especially relevant piece of our national history.” 

Eric Foner, author of The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution

Ellen Carol DuBois is one of the nation's leading historians of women's efforts to gain the right to vote. She was educated at Wellesley College and Northwestern University. After teaching at the University at Buffalo for 16 years (during which time she served on Hallwalls' board of directors and was an early supporter of Talking Leaves), she moved to Los Angeles to continue teaching at the University of California, Los Angeles. She retired from UCLA in 2017 as Distinguished Research Professor. She is the co-editor of the anthology Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in Women’s History and co-author of Through Women’s Eyes: An American History with Documents, both of which have gone through multiple editions. In 1998 she won the Joan Kelly Memorial Prize of the American Historical Association for her book Harriot Stanton Blach and the Winning of Woman Suffrage (Yale University Press).

 

Event date: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2020 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Event address: 
Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center
341 Delaware Ave
Buffalo, NY 14201
Suffrage: Women's Long Battle for the Vote Cover Image
$28.00
ISBN: 9781501165160
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Simon & Schuster - February 25th, 2020